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New Study Suggests Future Labor Shortfalls in Manufacturing

Source: https://www.builderonline.com/builder-100/strategy/crews-control_o

A recent study released by Deloitte and The Manufacturing Institute suggests that there may be a shortage in the amount of available skilled workers to fill all the available positions in the near future. According to the study jobs in the US manufacturing industry have increased due to technological advances. These advances have outpaced the amount of people skilled enough to fulfill these positions and it’s only getting worse. As skill-sets continue to shift with the introduction of newer tech and manufacturing automation we will see a further rise in the labor shortages.

 

Currently, it takes about 17 weeks to fill positions for skilled workers such as engineers, researchers, and scientists. As manufacturing continues adopting newer technology and automation the labor requirements will likely shift towards the higher-skilled workers. This compounds the existing labor shortages. According to an article by CNBC, “one of the most important economic stories of 2018: the difficulty employers are having in finding qualified employees to fill a record 6.7 million job openings.”. The construction industry is also among those impacted by the increasing need to fill skilled labor positions as the economy gets closer to full-employment.

 

 

So how can manufacturers overcome these obstacles?

  • Outsourcing specific functions (like IT, call us) to free up your existing personnel. This would allow you to get employees without these specific skill-sets.
  • Develop training programs internally to bring low-skilled workers to higher levels.
  • Bolstering apprenticeship programs to bring in and train lower-skilled workers.

 

Read the full study:

https://documents.deloitte.com/insights/2018DeloitteSkillsGapFoWManufacturing

https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/pages/manufacturing/articles/future-of-manufacturing-skills-gap-study.html